Orthodontics

Indications for Early Orthodontic Treatment

Orthodontics is a dental specialty that focuses on the diagnosis, prevention, interception, and treatment of malocclusions of the teeth and surrounding structures. Misaligned teeth are unattractive and can contribute to serious problems such as tooth decay. Orthodontists straighten teeth by the use of bands, wires, braces, and other fixed or removable corrective appliances or retainers.

If you notice any of the following warning signs of malocclusion in your child, it may be time to see an orthodontist:

  • Protruding teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet or meet in an irregular way
  • Crowding or misplaced teeth
  • Difficulty biting or chewing
  • Difficulties with speech

Invisalign Orthodontics

Individuals who want to avoid the appearance of traditional metal braces often turn to Invisalign as a "virtually invisible" alternative. We use cutting-edge 3-D diagnostic imaging to map your mouth, design a specialized treatment plan, and create a series of custom-made aligners. You wear each aligner for approximately two weeks, progressing to each set until you reach the goal you agreed upon with your dentist.

The benefits of Invisalign include:

  • More attractive: Invisalign's clear, virtually-invisible aligners often go unnoticed.
  • More comfortable: Traditional metal braces may irritate cheeks and gums. Invisalign's smooth plastic aligners are more comfortable to many patients.
  • Eat the foods you want: Invisalign can be removed at mealtimes. Unlike traditional braces, you do not have to avoid the "problem foods," such as popcorn and apples.
  • Natural brushing and flossing: Because the aligners are removable, you can maintain good oral hygiene by continuing to brush and floss your teeth.

Invisalign vs. Conventional Orthodontics

  • Braces: Braces are a time-tested and effective means of aligning teeth. Brackets are attached, or "bonded," to the teeth and a wire is linked from bracket to bracket, applying gentle pressure. This pressure works to gradually shift the teeth into their proper position. Braces can be used to correct even the most severe cases of misaligned teeth.
  • Invisalign: For those looking to avoid the appearance of traditional braces, Invisalign is often the answer. A series of customized, virtually-invisible aligners-each of which is worn for a period of approximately two weeks-works to slowly shift your teeth into proper alignment. Many patients find Invisalign to be a more attractive and comfortable alternative to traditional braces.

Preventing and Correcting Disharmonies of Growth Between the Upper and Lower Jaw

Disharmonies of growth between the upper and lower jaw can occur as your child is growing. An inconsistency between the length or width of the jaw can result in an imbalance of the facial bones, muscles and teeth. An orthodontist can reposition the jaw so that as growth continues, the bones and teeth align correctly. If the disharmonies are not addressed during childhood, they can result in major jaw issues that require orthognathic surgery on the jaw.

Functional appliances may be used to correct these disharmonies by manipulating growth and development. Since they reposition the jaw, functional appliances are often an initial stage of treatment done before braces are applied to the teeth.

Guiding the Development and Positioning of the Teeth

Primary, or baby, teeth are responsible for guiding the permanent teeth into the correct position. Sometimes problems occur that result in a disruption of this process. Using early intervention techniques, an orthodontist can guide the development and positioning of the teeth for a beautiful, functional smile.

First visits to an orthodontist are recommended at 7 years old or younger if there is an obvious malocclusion. The orthodontist will examine the child's mouth and jaws, take a dental history, complete a series of X-rays and possibly create impressions of the jaw. This helps your orthodontist make a diagnosis and create a customized treatment plan that may include extractions, appliances, braces, and other orthodontic techniques for optimal alignment of the teeth.

Eliminating Impairment of Chewing Ability Caused by a Malocclusion

Malocclusion refers to any abnormal alignment of the teeth, including an overbite, underbite, crossbite or crooked teeth. These conditions involve problems with the fit of the upper and lower teeth. Misaligned teeth can lead to excessive stress that can gradually loosen or crack teeth.

For some patients, crooked teeth can cause difficulties with chewing and eating. Most cases of malocclusion can be corrected restoring full function to the teeth. Many cases can be treated by removing certain teeth making room for teeth still erupting, then attaching braces to the teeth to straighten the bite.

Reducing the Susceptibility to Dental Decay and Gum Disease Caused by the Crowding of Teeth

Overcrowding of the teeth does not allow for good oral hygiene because it is often difficult to thoroughly clean tight spaces. Crooked teeth are a risk factor for gum disease, which is a leading cause of tooth loss. Plaque is the sticky film of bacteria that is brushed and flossed away with proper oral care. When left on the teeth, plaque produces toxins that attack below the gum line, causing the bond between teeth and gums to break down.

In the early stage of gum disease, gums may become red and swollen and bleed easily; in a more advanced stage, teeth can loosen and fall out. Good oral hygiene, regular dental examinations and addressing overcrowding issues are essential in the prevention of gum disease.

Eliminating Harmful Habits

Persistent harmful habits can affect the growth of the teeth and jaws and cause abnormalities. Thumb sucking is a very common self-soothing behavior in babies, and can be detrimental to the alignment of the teeth as children get older. Parents can help stop thumb sucking by comforting an anxious child and offering them praise for keeping the thumb out of the mouth. Your dentist can explain to your child how thumb sucking affects the mouth in order to discourage the behavior.

Tongue thrusting is when the tongue moves to a forward position in the mouth during swallowing. This habit can cause an open bite and other orthodontic issues. A night guard or another appliance can sometimes correct the problem. In other cases, oral therapy is necessary to train the patient to change the tongue's posture.

Improving Appearance of the Face and Mouth Area

Crooked, overlapping or misaligned teeth can be a cause of embarrassment when smiling. Orthodontic services are designed with the goal of achieving an attractive, healthy smile for every patient. Patients who undergo orthodontic treatment often enjoy greater self-confidence.

Correcting Temporomandibular Joint Abnormalities

A bad bite can be the cause of a disorder of the temporomandibular joint, also known as TMJ. The disorder is characterized by facial pain, headaches, earaches and clicking sounds in the jaw joint. The TMJ moves every time you talk, chew or swallow. It is one of the most frequently used joints in your body.

There are various treatments available for TMJ disorders, including wearing a mouth guard, therapeutic exercises and surgery. In some cases, orthodontic treatment can be beneficial in realigning the teeth to improve the patient's bite and help the jaw fit together properly.

Adult Orthodontics

Orthodontic treatment is just not for children. While it is very beneficial to catch bite problems early because the bones are still growing, malocclusions can be successfully treated at any age. Crooked teeth, overbites, underbites, misaligned jaws and other dental issues can be corrected in adults in a little more time than children's orthodontics takes. Aside from achieving a beautiful smile you can wear proudly, orthodontics can provide you with a healthier mouth because straight teeth are much easier to clean, reducing your chances of developing tooth decay and gum disease.

Orthodontics and Orthognathic Surgery

Orthognathic surgery is needed when the jaw does not meet correctly or the teeth do not seem to "fit" with your jaw. In most cases, teeth are straightened with orthodontics after corrective jaw surgery. Orthognathic surgery allows for the repositioning of teeth and facial bones to create a more balanced appearance with a jaw that works and functions properly.

Difficulty in the following areas should be evaluated :

  • Protruding jaw or chin
  • Elongated chin
  • Deficient chin
  • "Gummy" smile
  • Open bite
  • Difficulty in chewing, biting, or swallowing
  • Chronic TMJ pain

Implants and Orthodontics

In traditional orthodontics, teeth are used as anchors, applying force to surrounding teeth, moving them into a more desirable positions. Recent breakthroughs in dentistry has allowed for the use of dental implants as anchors. Dental implants can withstand a much greater force than a tooth, facilitating faster treatments and relying much less on patient compliance. Implants can be used in patients with missing teeth or all of their natural teeth. Implants have created orthodontic correction opportunities for patients, with dental issues, that would not have been treated using traditional techniques.